[accordion title=”Coating of Bridges” close=”1″]

“What is Needed for a Bridge Coating to Last 100 Years or More?”

(PDF 62Kb) Although bridge construction extends back thousands of years, steel bridge painting is in its infancy. The first iron bridge was built in 1779, and the first steel was used in a bridge in 1828. Coated bridges from the 19th century survive, raising the question, “Can coatings protect steel bridges for the next hundred years?” The author discusses how to achieve 100 years of service life using current materials and offers recommendations for improving steel bridge painting…Read More

Eric S. Kline, PCS, Executive Vice President
Scott B. Rice, Manager, VP of Business Development
John M. Ekiert, PE, Project Manager, Pennsylvania[/accordion]

[accordion title=”Coating Failure Case Histories” close=”1″]

“The Ethics of Coatings Failure Investigations – Are you Getting What You Deserve?,”

By Raymond S. Tombaugh, March 2012.
“The Case of… Three (Consultants),” a two-part F-Files column published in the November and December 2010 issues of JPCL, described observations and conclusions reached by three different consultants, each looking at the same bridge coating system. The article pointed out that clients sometimes retain consultants to perform very specific and limited examinations of the alleged failing coatings. Clients may also request reports that address specific issues, questions, or requirements. This month’s column describes a set of circumstances that forces us further down the path, where a difference of opinion exists, “before the sun sets.” Sometimes the differences of opinion are legitimate and arise from alternative but reasonable interpretations of data and available information–other times, not so much…Read More

“The Case of … One Too Many Choices,”

by Eric S. Kline and Richard A. Burgess, January 2012:
This is the story of a steel bridge in the northeastern U.S., but it could be true of a bridge anywhere in the U.S. The structure, although nearly 50 years old, was sturdy and still within its design life. The State Department of Transportation (DOT) District maintenance engineers, during review and planning, determined there was no need to consider demolition and replacement of the bridge. However, it was determined that a deck overlay replacement should be part of the bridge deck maintenance program. The DOT wanted to address the paint system as part of the same contract letting…Read More

“Thermal Imaging as a Forensic Tool in Coating Failure Investigations”

(PDF 218 Kb) This paper discusses the use of thermal imaging as an analytical tool in forensic investigations of moisture-related coating failures applied over hollow core building walls. The success of thermal imaging depends upon detecting subtle temperature differences arising from differences in thermal conductivity of the coated wall surfaces. The method is a valuable adjunct to contemporary failure investigation methodology…Read More
E. Bud Senkowski, P.E., Senior Coatings Consultant

“Coating Failures-Causes and Corrections”

(PDF 87Kb) Industrial and marine protective coating systems are most commonly applied without incident, and perform as expected over their anticipated service life. However, occasionally, a coating system will fail prematurely, for unexpected reasons, and with expensive consequences. This paper addresses those unexpected failures, and provides reasons and remedies for such occurrences…Read More
Kenneth B. Tator, PE, KTA-Tator, Inc.

“The Case of…October Showers Bring November Rust Spots,”

By Jayson L. Helsel, P.E., May 2012.
In this month’s Cases from the F-Files, rust spots became evident on the interior roof deck of a newly constructed, unoccupied warehouse. Were the rust spots a result of what was going on inside or outside of the warehouse? …Read More

“The Case of… Three (Consultants),”

a two-part F-Files column published in the November and December 2010 issues of JPCL, described observations and conclusions reached by three different consultants, each looking at the same bridge coating system. The article pointed out that clients sometimes retain consultants to perform very specific and limited examinations of the alleged failing coatings. Clients may also request reports that address specific issues, questions, or requirements. This month’s column describes a set of circumstances that forces us further down the path, where a difference of opinion exists, “before the sun sets.” Sometimes the differences of opinion are legitimate and arise from alternative but reasonable interpretations of data and available information–other times, not so much…Read More

[/accordion]
[accordion title=”Coating Inspection” close=”1″]

Inspection and Quality: How Far Have We Come in 45 Years?

This article compares some of the inspection practices, equipment, and standards that were available in the mid-to late-1960s with those of today—to see how the industry has developed since that time. Have we addressed the problems that were identified by coatings professionals 45 years ago? Have we created new ones? Are we better off?…Read More
Kenneth A. Trimber, President, KTA-Tator, Inc.

“Preparing an Inspection Plan for Bridge Maintenance Painting”

(PDF114Kb) A bridge coatings specification can be a complex and sometimes confusing document to navigate through. Yet it is regarded as the rulebook for quality control and quality assurance personnel responsible for inspecting the quality of work. An inspection plan is a tool that can make the process of understanding the inspection checkpoints invoked by a bridge coating specification more streamlined, and can be a key communication tool for contractor and inspection personnel. This presentation reviews the purpose and benefits of developing an inspection plan and the content of SSPC’s Guide for Planning Coatings Inspection, illustrates two formats for inspection plans and demonstrates how to populate an inspection plan based on the requirements of a bridge coating specification…Read More
William D. Corbett, Professional Services Manager

“Factors Influencing Anchor Profile”

(PDF 69Kb) Anchor profile achieved during field blast cleaning operations is often found to be deeper than expected, even when available information suggests the size of the abrasive selected was appropriate. Three parameters long identified as influencing anchor profile depth were evaluated under laboratory conditions. This paper discusses the results obtained by changing blast nozzle pressure, angle of attack (incidence) and stand-off distance on the anchor profile achieved when blast cleaning with steel grit. Anchor profiles obtained from preliminary field data are also briefly described…View

Ken Barnett, PE – Texas Department of Transportation
Richard A. Burgess – Senior Coatings Consultant[/accordion]

[accordion title=”Commercial Properties” close=”1″]

“Formula for Success: With SPF Applications, Quality Assurance is King,”

By Kevin Brown. July/August 2012.
A combination of economic drivers and technical advances has driven the development of an expanded array of solutions for roofing systems and energy-efficient improvements in commercial buildings… Read More.

“Coating Failures and Misapplications in Commercial Painting”

(PDF 58Kb) While commercial painting is often thought to be less rigorous or less technical than industrial painting, the commercial painting industry has its own set of demands on a coating and is not without its share of coating problems. The authors experience demonstrates that there are commonalities in failures of coatings in commercial painting. This paper discusses a number of failures that are commonly found in the commercial painting field including painting of galvanized surfaces, coating of concrete surfaces (both floors and exterior building facades), use of elastomeric coatings, painting intricate surfaces, and painting plaster, drywall and wood surfaces. The paper describes both the cause of the failures and the appropriate methods of remediation and prevention…Read More
Raymond S. Tombaugh, Senior Coatings Consultant

“Coating Problems Faced by Commercial Building Owners”

(PDF 83Kb) Big box stores typically consist of a steel framework of structural columns and roof joists overlaid with roof decking. Walls are usually Single Wythe concrete masonry units (CMU), tilt up concrete panels, or colored block and brick. The CMU often consists of one or more block types – smooth face, split face, or scored block, all of which are painted. Smooth tilt up panels are painted or sealed, and colored block and brick are sealed. The walls may also be covered with an Exterior Insulation and Finish System (EIFS) or stucco, both of which are painted…Read More
Kenneth A. Trimber, President, KTA-Tator, Inc.
Kevin J. Brown, Manager, Commercial Services, KTA-Tator, Inc.
Kevin D. Knight, Architectural Testing, Inc.
[/accordion]

[accordion title=”Coating In Galvanizing” close=”1″]

“Maintenance Painting of Galvanized Mast Arms: A Project Performed Despite Budget Constraints”

(PDF 651Kb) Premature failures of coatings applied to galvanized mast arms is not an unfamiliar problem1. The properties of galvanizing that make it a difficult substrate to coat when new don’t simply disappear from beneath the original coating system. When maintenance painting is necessary after a few years of service, long term success can be elusive. This paper will discuss the development of maintenance painting process developed to accommodate budget constraints and produce a satisfactory outcome…Read More
Rich Burgess, Senior Consultant
Greg Richards, Project Manager/Consultant

“Galvanic Drilling and Problems With Coating Dissimilar Metals in Corrosive Environments”

(PDF 421Kb) The installation of protective coating systems must be accomplished in a manner that will avoid adverse electrolytic coupling between dissimilar metals in water tanks, process equipment, and even some atmospheric applications where condensing humidity and rainwater provide the aqueous medium for electrolytes. This paper discusses several examples of premature coating and structural failures resulting from the mixing of dissimilar metal types in systems where the anode and cathode areas are not optimized by design or engineering controls…Read More
David S. Leyland, formerly with KTA-Tator, Inc.
E. Bud Senkowski, PE, Senior Coatings Consultant

“Coating Failures on Painted Galvanized Mast Arms”

(PDF 543 Kb) Galvanized mast arms support uncounted numbers of traffic signals and signage throughout the United States. The proportion of these that have a “duplex” coating system (both galvanizing and organic coatings) is unknown. However, the number is surely significant, and the number of coating system failures is also significant. The Florida Department of Transportation has estimated there are at least 2,400 mast arm coating failures throughout the State, 150 in the Jacksonville, FL area alone. The authors will discuss findings and experiences from investigating the causes for failures of the mast arm duplex systems and remedies available to owners…Read More
Paul Vinik, MSChE, P.E., Florida Department of Transportation
Richard A. Burgess, Senior Coatings Consultant, KTA-Tator, Inc.

“Practical Considerations for the Life Cycle Evaluation of Zinc-Rich Coatings, Galvanized Steel and Thermal Sprayed Metals for Industrial Structures in Moderate Environmental Exposures”

(PDF 224Kb) This paper provides an objective review of the life cycle costs of zinc-rich coating systems used in moderate industrial exposure environments. The coating systems include conventional inorganic/organic coatings, galvanizing, and thermal sprayed metal coatings (metallizing). Service life and installation cost data from previous studies is used to calculate the life cycle costs over a specified design life of an industrial structure. The life cycle costs are based on a suggested maintenance painting sequence that is outlined. A review of the costs for both shop and field coating application are discussed…View
Jayson L. Helsel, P.E. – Senior Coatings Consultant

[/accordion]

[accordion title=”Compositional & Physical Properties of Coatings” close=”1″]

Laboratory Testing of Candidate Coating Systems for Protecting A 490 Bolts in One World Trade Center Construction

” (PDF 178Kb) The construction of the new One World Trade Center (WTC) in New York includes exposed steel members and bolted splice plates. Accordingly, surface preparation and coating system selection for the bolt/washer/nut assemblies for the bolted connections was critical, since the splice plates would be visible. There was little published information on surface preparation and coating requirements for ASTM A 490 black bolts. Further, since on site surface preparation of bolted connections would be costly and labor intensive, the Port Authority of New York & New Jersey (Port Authority) investigated the viability of using a proprietary pretreatment process on the bolts prior to installation and coating application, in order to minimize on‐site surface preparation without adversely affecting coating system adhesion or performance…

View

John Bullard, Port Authority of New York & New Jersey
William D. Corbett, Professional Services Manager, KTA‐Tator, Inc.

”Time is Money: Improving Shop and Field Painting Throughout by Reducing Finish Coat Handling Time”

(PDF 558Kb) Handling and transportation of finish coated steel from the fabrication shop to the project site is impacted by the length of time that the finish coat must dry. Known as shop-field throughput, a reduction in the dry time required prior to handling (without compromising performance), as well as a minimization of handling damage can greatly reduce project costs. The authors believe that it may be possible to save at least one or possibly two full days of throughput time by using a two coat system (organic zinc or inorganic zinc silicate primer with a fast dry finish coat) compared to a two-coat or three-coat system with a slower drying finish coat. Additionally, faster dry times reduce the risk of dust, abrasive and other airborne contaminants from becoming embedded into the finished product. This study compares the handling time of three generic types of high performance finish coats cured under normal and cold/damp conditions, applied as two and three-coat systems, using traditional standardized test procedures as well as novel testing procedures designed to simulate actual handling and environmental conditions in the shop or field…Read More
William D. Corbett, Professional Services Manager

“Slip Coefficient and Tension Creep Testing Protocol for Coatings Used in Bolted Connections”

(PDF 1093Kb) Appendix A of the Specification for Structural Steel Joints Using ASTM A325 or A490 Bolts published by the Research Council on Structural Connections describes the testing methods to determine the slip coefficient of coatings used in bolted connections. This paper will describe the importance of establishing the slip coefficient of faying surfaces, and will present the “soup-to-nuts” process associated with testing and certifying coatings used in slip-critical connections – from test panel fabrication to surface preparation, coating application (including thinning, thickness and curing variables), selection of mating surfaces, testing for resistance to slip and tensioned creep, and data reporting including A, B and C classifications. Data from various generic coatings types previously tested will also be presented, and research needs will be described. Finally, the importance of application and curing of the coating in the shop or field according to the variables employed during testing and certification will be reinforced…Read More
William D. Corbett, Professional Services Business Unit Manager
Carly McGee, Physical Testing Laboratory Supervisor

“Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy To Verify Chemical Consistency Of Industrial Coatings The Application Of Instrumental Comparative Methods”

(PDF 230Kb) The use of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy combined with knowledge of coating chemistry is key for assessing chemical consistency of industrial coatings. Incomplete knowledge of coating chemistry, improper sample preparation techniques and/or instrument use, as well as improper interpretation of infrared spectra can result in inconsistent chemical comparisons of batches used for initial qualification to field batches…Read More
Derrick Castle, Kentucky Transportation Cabinet
Cynthia L. O’Malley, Manager, Laboratory Services, KTA-Tator, Inc.

“A 20 Year Performance Evaluation of an Organic Zinc Rich Paint System”

(PDF 135 Kb) A five-year coatings research project was initiated by the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation in 1986 to evaluate the performance of an organic zinc rich coating system. The coating system consisted of a moisture cured urethane zinc rich primer, an epoxy intermediate, and an aliphatic polyester urethane finish coat. The system was applied to the Windgap Bridge located in McKees Rocks, Pennsylvania (near the City of Pittsburgh) in 1986 and 1987. Coating system performance was tracked for the next five years using a preestablished protocol of visual inspections and physical testing. The coating system, which has now reached a twenty-year milestone, was re-inspected in 2007. Even though no coating maintenance work was performed since the initial installation, the coating system continues to provide good corrosion protection and has maintained a good appearance…Read More
James D. Machen, Senior Coatings Consultant

“Cure Temperature Effects on Standard Cure and Low Temperature Cure Epoxies”

(PDF 163Kb) This paper examines the effect that curing temperature has on the physical characteristics and performance of standard cure polyamide epoxies as compared low temperature cure epoxies. The purpose for this paper is threefold: FIRST, to determine if the low temperature curing epoxies are viable substitutes for the standard cure epoxies. SECOND, to determine if curing temperature can adversely affect the cure of epoxy coatings, thereby compromising corrosion protection. THIRD, to determine if a product from one manufacturer is an acceptable substitute for a similar product from another manufacturer?…View
David S. Leyland – formerly with KTA-Tator, Inc.
Cindy O’Malley – Manager, Laboratory Services

“Southern Nevada Water Authority-Polyurethane Lining Evaluation and Testing”

(PDF 270Kb) The Southern Nevada Water Authority (SNWA) is a regional agency whose mission is to manage water resources and develop solutions that will ensure adequate future water supplies for the Las Vegas Valley. Its primary water resource is the Colorado River via Lake Mead. Since 2000, persistent droughts have resulted in decreasing Lake Mead water levels. To reduce Southern Nevada’s reliance on the Colorado River, SNWA has begun planning for the development of in-state groundwater resources north of Las Vegas. Initial planning efforts identified project specific requirements that could potentially justify the use of polyurethane lining systems in lieu of traditional cement mortar lining for over 200 miles of large diameter water transmission pipeline…Read More
Cindy L. O’Malley, Manager, Laboratory Services, KTA-Tator, Inc.
Scott Christensen, HDR Engineering, Inc.
Gina Neilson, Southern Nevada Water Authority[/accordion]

[accordion title=”Moisture/Air Intrusion” close=”1″]

“Measuring Moisture in Walls,”

by Kenneth A. Trimber and Kevin J. Brown, April 2012, Interface: The Journal of RCI, pp. 29-36…. Read More.

“Use of Atlas Test Cells to Assess the Performance of Coatings over CMU with Varied Permeance”

(PDF 5118 Kb) The permeance of coatings applied to the walls of Single Wythe concrete masonry units (CMU) can affect the long-term performance of the coating, especially after being repainted multiple times. This paper describes the results of a study to determine if the Atlas Cell Test (NACE TM0174) can be modified to evaluate the performance of individual coating systems based upon permeance. Coating systems with permeance (WVP US perm ratings) from 60 were used in the research. The goal of the test program is to establish a protocol that can eventually be used to determine the number of times that a given system can be repainted before the reduction in permeance causes concerns with blistering or peeling.
(Due to the size of this file, please e-mail info@kta.com for the file.)..Read More
Cynthia L. O’Malley, Laboratory Services Manager
Chuck Duffin, Sto Corp.
Steven Revnew, Sherwin-Williams

“Moisture Vapor Emission Rates of Concrete Floors – Can Moisture Meters be used Instead of Calcium Chloride?”

(PDF 541Kb) The moisture vapor emission rate (MVER) of concrete floors affects the selection of flooring materials for both new construction and remodel projects. The MVER is determined by exposing a 20″ x 20″ test area to calcium chloride for 60 to 72 hours. Because of the length of time and size of the test areas required for the calcium chloride test, it would be advantageous if the instantaneous results provided by moisture meters could be used for decision-making. This paper presents the data obtained from field studies that compared calcium chloride test results with 3 different types of moisture meters…Read More
Kevin Brown, Commercial Services Manager
George Holz, AIA

“Avoiding Problems With Coating Wood: A Review of Substrate Condition and Preparation, Moisture Issues and Coating Selection”

(PDF 134Kb) This paper provides a review of key items to consider in coating wood. The most important considerations are ensuring a sound wood substrate surface, elimination of moisture as a problem, adequate surface preparation, and the proper choice of coatings. Coatings for wood can be categorized as film-forming or penetrating finishes. This paper expands on a recent related article published in the Journal of Architectural Coatings…View

Jayson L. Helsel, P.E. – KTA-Tator, Inc.

“Properties of Air Barrier Materials

” (PDF 909Kb) This paper will describe the fundamental properties of many of the air barrier materials available for environmental separation and air tightening of buildings. It will discuss the basic requirements for an air barrier; however, there are many different air barriers materials available, and many of these materials can provide other needed properties including vapor, moisture, and thermal barriers. Each material may be fabricated to provide the needed properties to accomplish one or several of these functions. Specific material properties must be developed during manufacturing or application at specific thicknesses to allow the material to perform. The paper will discuss the application of these materials, and how their placement within the wall is effected by their intended function(s), and the expected exterior and interior environmental conditions to which they may be exposed during and after construction…

View
Mike MeLampy – formerly with KTA-Tator, Inc.
“Variables That Affect Calcium Moisture Chloride Testing”

(PDF 78Kb) The calcium chloride moisture vapor transmission test has steadily gained acceptance in the floor coating industry. This paper discusses variables that affect the results of moisture vapor transmission testing, and presents the results of testing designed to measure the affects of certain environmental parameters on the results of calcium chloride moisture vapor transmission testing…View
Rick Huntley – Manager, Consulting Services[/accordion]

[accordion title=”Trade Association Activity” close=”1″]

“The New SSPC Commercial/Light Industrial Committee”

(PDF 22Kb) SSPC has started a new committee to develop standards and guides for commercial, light industrial and institutional cleaning and painting; concrete floor polishing; the use of thin film coatings as air barriers; and commercial contractor certification (SSPC-QP 9). The presentation will describe the activities that are underway together with opportunities for participation…Read More

Kenneth A. Trimber, President
Cynthia L. O’Malley, Laboratory Services Manager
Chuck Duffin, Sto Corp.
Steven Revnew, Sherwin-Williams

“Women in Coatings: The Present State and a Glimpse of our Future”

(PDF 85Kb) During the inaugural “Women in Coatings” session held at SSPC GreenCOAT 2011 a survey was developed and distributed to conference participants to determine the present state of the role of women in coatings industry. This presentation summarizes the data obtained from the survey responses. Once the present state is established and agreed upon, the group will establish a strategic plan and pursue gaols based upon defined strategy. This defined strategy will enable the group to achieve goals by measuring and evaluating our progress and ultimately our success as a group with a common vision. This process will be described in the presentation…Read More
Cynthia L. O’Malley, Laboratory Services Manager
[/accordion]

[accordion title=”Specification Preparation” close=”1″]

“Specifications and MasterFormat™ 2004”

(PDF 182Kb) This paper will describe the fundamentals of MasterFormat™ 2004 and how its use can simplify the specification writing process. MasterFormat™ 2004 is jointly produced by the Construction Specifications Institute (CSI), and Construction Specifications Canada (CSC). Contractors, Owners and Specifiers can all benefit from the use of these guiding principals of specification development, especially when surface preparation, hazardous remediation, and coatings and linings are part of a larger overall scope of work. The coatings (sub) contractor can benefit by knowing how to find all pertinent data so that bids can be prepared properly. The owner can benefit by having a clearly organized specification. The specifier can benefit, as the logical format for organizing large specifications will result in less of a chance for conflicting information. MasterFormat is becoming the standard of care for the preparation of specifications…View

Mike MeLampy – formerly with KTA-Tator, Inc.[/accordion]

[accordion title=”Worker Safety & Environmental Impact” close=”1″]

“Going Global: OSHA Revises Hazard Communication Standard,”

By Alison B. Kaelin, CQA, August 2012.
On March 28, 2012, OSHA issued a final rule on the sweeping changes to the Hazardous Communications Rules for General Industry, Construction Industry, and Maritime Industries to correspond to the United Nations’ Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (GHS). GHS is being implemented throughout the world by countries including Canada, the European Union, China, Australia, and Japan….Read More (Regulation News)

“Enforcing Regulations in Steel Fabrication and Coating Shops,”

By Alison B. Kaelin, CQA, April 2012.
This article is part of the JPCL’s Top Thinker series. The article focuses on OSHA regulations and enforcement activities related to steel fabrication, shop coating, powder coatings, and galvanized operations that fall under OSHA’s General Industry Standards. The author also reviews EPA requirements for these facilities under NESHAP……..Read More.

“Regulatory Update: Current and Emerging Trends in Occupational and Environmental Health”

(PDF 105Kb) This annual paper summarizes and tracks environmental, health and safety issues that may impact painting contactors and facility owners. This paper summarizes regulatory and enforcement developments in the current year and reviews expected rulemaking for the coming year. Specific topics include OSHA’s proposed update to the Hazard Communications standard and the anticipated Silica rule in 2011. We will review new actions related to EPA’s NAAQS Lead standard and other EPA regulations. Most of the information is taken directly from the respective agency’s published regulatory agenda, supplemented by anecdotal information gathered from various professional journals, seminars and conferences…Read More
Alison B. Kaelin, ASQ-CQA, QA Manager

“Regulatory Update: Current and Emerging Trends in Occupational and Environmental Health”

(PDF 98Kb) This paper takes a look at emerging environmental, health and safety issues that may impact painting contactors and facility owners. Specific topics include a summary of OSHA and EPA’s new and proposed revised regulations related to lead, paint, and construction. Information will be provided on EPA regulatory actions related to NAAQS Lead and the recent advanced notice of proposed rulemaking for Lead; Renovation, Repair, and Painting Program for Public and Commercial Buildings. Much of the information is taken directly from the respective agency’s published regulatory agenda, supplemented by anecdotal information gathered from various professional journals, seminars and conferences…Read More 
Alison B. Kaelin, CQA, Quality Assurance Manager

“New Lead Regulations

” (PDF 102Kb) This paper addresses two recent regulatory actions regarding lead. The first is the October 15, 2008 revision to the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Lead. The second regulation is the August 14, 2008 update to the OSHA Instruction: National Emphasis Program – Lead, which describes OSHA’s nation-wide emphasis on reducing occupational lead exposures. The authors will overview the regulatory actions and discuss potential impacts on the painting industry…Read More
Alison B. Kaelin, CQA, Quality Assurance Manager
Daniel O’Malley, Manager, EH&S Services

“Regulatory Update: Current And Emerging  Trends In Occupational And Environmental Health”

(PDF 301Kb) This paper takes a look at emerging environmental, health and safety issues that may impact painting contractors and facility owners. Specific topics include OSHA’s proposed revisions to the Hazard Communications standard, updated information on silica and hexavalent chromium, and expected rule making in 2010. Additionally, information will be provided on EPA regulatory actions related to NAAQS Lead and PM2.5 and other EPA regulations. Much of the information is taken directly from the respective agency’s published regulatory agenda, supplemented by anecdotal information gathered from various professional journals, seminars and conferences…View
Alison B. Kaelin, CQA, Quality Assurance Manager

“Regulatory Update: Current and Emerging Trends in Occupational and Environmental Health”

(PDF 136 Kb) This paper takes a look at emerging environmental, health and safety issues that may impact painting contactors and facility owners. Specific topics include OSHA’s hexavalent chromium standard, recent rulings related to multi-employer worksite policy and OSHA’s use of threshold limit values (TLVs®). The expected final rule on employer-paid personal protective equipment (PPE), the proposed confined space entry standard for construction, the proposed revisions to the hazard communication standard, and the American National Standards Institute standard on Hearing Loss Prevention in construction are described. EPA’s review of the NAAQS for lead and the potential implications of PM2.5 standard enforcement are reviewed. Additionally, recently enacted New York City regulations regarding scaffolding, noise mitigation, and emission control from construction vehicles are discussed. Much of the information is taken directly from the respective agency’s published regulatory agenda, supplemented by anecdotal information gathered from various professional journals, seminars and conferences…View
Alison B. Kaelin, CQA, Quality Assurance Manager
Daniel OMalley, Manager EH&S Services

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